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See Me Bronx
The Bronx Museum explores the nuances of identity through a series of prompts directed into the collective social space.

Through social media posts, the Bronx Museum invites the public to engage in discourse — to participate forming their own questions about identity, visibility and/or intersectionality. 

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Chantal Fischzang is a designer and educator based in the NY/NJ area.

Along with her role as Assistant Professor of Graphic Design at Rutgers University-Newark, Chantal is a founding member of IntraCollaborative, a team of designers and educators sharing a deep-seated interest in design and its relevance to the social sector.

Chantal integrates publicly engaged practice and design education through her work at Express Newark, as Co-Director of Visual Means and Design Consortium, two academic programs that model a design-studio working experience in which faculty, students, researchers and community partners engage in a collaborative design process to create impact in the city of Newark.

Collaborations

Through my academic research at Rutgers University-Newark, I’ve experienced a clear intersection and productive exchange between my career focus, my role in the classroom and my responsibility to the community — through collaboration, co-building, social engagement and service learning — so I continued to investigate ways in which social contexts can be applied to the fundamentals of graphic design: image, word, message-making and the technological conditions of the medium.

One of the most important aspects of my professional development has been the collaborative process. The strategy, decision making and design process behind highly charged social issues, are more purposely founded and more democratic when it is informed by a collaborative and/or participatory process with partners, clients, audiences.

Partners

I believe in the people I work with and in the power of design.

Let's connect!

See Me Bronx

See Me Bronx is an interactive installation conceptualized by the Bronx Museum's Holly Block Social Justice Curator Jasmine Wahi, and designed in collaboration with Rebecca Jampol.

In November of 2020, the Bronx Museum unveiled this interactive window display about visibility, intersectionality, and identity, as a way to interact with the public, during a time of social distance protocols. The project kicked off the Museum's 50th anniversary, which is thematically oriented around visibility as a tenet of social justice, reaffirming its mission as an admission-free, liberated space for communities to come to enjoy art and have important conversations.

See Me Bronx was created as a way to spark conversations about identity, equity, and inclusion, among the many intersecting communities that surrounds it. As a way to dive into dialogue, the Bronx proposes tough but important questions, and the hope is to have the public join the museum in shaping the conversation with their queries.

Everyone is invited to participate!
/ Form your own question about identity, visibility, and/or intersectionality
/ Write down your question on a sign (cardboard, paper, canvas- whatever you have!)
/ Take a selfie holding your sign (or have a friend/sibling/family member take one from a safe social distance) You can take your selfie anywhere- at home, in the park, or even at the Bronx Museum when you visit!
/ Share your selfie & tag @bronxmuseum with the hashtag #seemebronx.

Vinyl Graphics Installation: Full Point Graphics
Font: Corundum by Darden Studios

Partners